Doctor’s Office Role Play Part 3

Doctor's Office Role Play for English Learners 3

Welcome to our Daily English Listening Practice with this week’s series:

Doctor’s Office Role Play

Arriving at the Doctor’s Office

If this is your first time here, you might wanna check out Role Play: At the Doctor’s Day 1 to start from the beginning!

Grab the transcripts here:

Transcripts for Doctor Role Play 3

American English Dialogue: on top
British English Dialogue: scroll down

American Doctor’s Office Role Play

USA – On the Phone
What’s Wrong?


There are 3 different conversations in this American English dialogue between a receptionist and a patient.

—Transcript Option 1—

(On the phone)

Receptionist: And what are you seeing the doctor for?

Patient: Uhm, I’m having some knee problems – I’d like to get my knee checked out.

—Transcript Option 2—
Receptionist: And what is your appointment about?

Patient: Uhm, my daughter’s been having a really bad fever. She’s had a fever all week so I think she needs to come in and see a doctor.

—Transcript Option 3—
Receptionist: And what can the doctor do for you?

Patient: Uhm, it’s something personal, erm…

Receptionist: No problem – no problem. You’d like to discuss it with the doctor?

Patient: Yes please.

If you’d like to understand the difference between “a check-up” and “getting something checked out” have a look at our Health Series Vocabulary: Part 5

Extra Notes

USA – On the Phone
Where is the office?


This American English clip will give you some possible phrases when talking to the receptionist.

—Phrases—
Patient: Hi, I have an appointment today, I’m in the building but I can’t find the office.

Patient: Okay, I’m near the Baybrook shopping mall.

Receptionist: You need to go to the fifth floor. We’re on the second level.

Receptionist: Well if you take a left from the shopping center you’ll see us on the right.

Culture Notes:
The easiest thing is to simply tell them where you are. We love landmarks: I can see three shopping stores. There’s a restaurant at the corner. I’m on Falling Leaf Drive near the dentist’s office. I’m at the corner of Lincoln and Washington, near the Dunkin Donuts. The receptionist will often ask “Do you know where…. is?” “Yes, I do or simply no, not really.” Then, they’ll give you more information.

USA – On the Phone
I’m late


—Transcript—
Patient: Hi there, my name is Jim Lyons, I had an appointment booked for two o’clock but I think I’m gonna be about 15 minutes late.

Receptionist: Okay, normally ask our patients to go ahead and reschedule if they’re gonna be that late but let me check the appointment book. Okay, it looks like we’ve had a cancellation this afternoon, so as long as you’re not gonna be much later than that, it should be alright. We’ll see you at about two thirty.

Patient: Ok, thank you.

Culture Notes:
It’s a good idea to let them know that you’ll be late. They may have to cancel your appointment if you’re too late, 15-20 minutes, and you don’t want to show up and find out at the office.

USA – On the Phone
Cancellation


This American audio clip is between the receptionist and a patient.
—Transcript—

(on the phone)

Patient: Hi there, this is Ms Fitz. I have to cancel my appointment for my son tomorrow. Yeah, something came up so, I’m gonna have to cancel and I’ll call you next week to try to reschedule. Thank you.

Culture Notes:
You can often reschedule right away if you have a time ready, however if you have to cancel in a rush, then call them back another time.

USA – Arriving at the Office


This American audio clip is between the receptionist or front office staff and a patient.

—Transcript—

Patient: Hi there, I have an appointment at four o’clock.

Receptionist: Okay, you’re just gonna need to sign your name here and also make the time of your appointment.

Patient: Okay. I think I’ve filled out everything.

Receptionist: You’re a new patient correct?

Patient: Yeah that’s right.

Receptionist: Okay, you’re gonna need to fill out these forms and bring them up to the window when you’re finished. I’m also gonna need to see a copy of your driver’s license and your insurance card.

Patient: Okay, here’s my driver’s license and here’s the insurance card. And these are my forms here.

Receptionist: Okay, I’ll take these and file them away, the doctor will see you shortly. Just to let you know we only accept check and cash as – for your payment for your co-payment.   

Culture Notes:
Go straight to reception when you arrive, sometimes this is an opaque glass window or door in the waiting room, and the receptionist will open it when you approach the window. You’ll usually need to sign in with your appointment time, and if you’re a new patient, you’ll need to fill out some forms by hand. These are usually Patient Registration and Medical History. They will usually make copies of your driver’s license or ID and your insurance card for their records.

Every doctor’s office is different, but here’s an example of a New Patient Form you can download for free. SS number is your Social Security Number
Here’s another example of a Patient Medical History Form, as well.

USA – Getting Called into the Back

This American audio clip is between the front office staff and a patient.

—Transcript—

Receptionist: Mister, uhm. mister Lyons?….Jim Lyons?

Patient: Oh, yeah that’s me.

Receptionist: Alright, I’ll take you right into the back here to see the doctor….Alright, we’re gonna go ahead and check your height and weight so please take your shoes off and step up on the scale…Alright, a hundred and eighty five pounds and about six foot, and a quarter inch. Okay great, I’ll lead you back to the room now… Alright, you can take a seat right here, then the nurse will be in in a moment to check your blood pressure and take your temperature, okay they’ll be in soon.”

Culture Notes:
The standard procedure is: get called in, get weighed, check your height, meet with a nurse or assistant in the room to discuss any problems, check your temperature, check your blood pressure, possibly change clothes into a hospital gown or dressing gown, wait and meet with the doctor.

British Doctor’s Office Role Play

UK – On the Phone
What’s wrong?


This British English dialogue is between the receptionist and a patient.
—Transcript—

Receptionist: And what is your appointment concerning?

Patient: Uhm, I hurt my foot really badly last week, so I think I should get it checked out by the doctor.


This British English dialogue is between the receptionist and a patient.
—Transcript—
Receptionist: Ok, and what’s the appointment regarding?

Patient: I’ve just been pretty terrible this week so I’d just like to check in with the doctor.

Culture Notes:
“Just a check-up.” This is quite similar to the restaurant role-plays and “Just water please.” When making a simple request, like a check-up, you can say “Just a check-up”. If you’d like to understand the difference between “a check-up” and “getting something checked out” have a look at our Health Series Vocabulary: Part 5

UK – On the Phone
Where is the office?


This British English dialogue is between the receptionist and a patient.
—Transcript—
Patient: Hey there, I have an appointment later today. Where is your office located?

Receptionist: Uhm, we’re located in the middle of Rowhedge Road, so if you go down Head Street take a right, you’ll see us on the left side of the street. We’re opposite the big Halifax bank.

Patient: Okay, I know exactly where that is, thank you.

Culture Notes:
GPs are usually small detached buildings. So they are normally very easy to find.  

UK – On the Phone
I’m late


This British English dialogue is between the receptionist and a patient.
—Transcript—

Patient: Hi there, I have an appointment later today but I’m pretty sure I’m gonna be about 15 or 20 minutes late.

Receptionist: Oh okay, unfortunately we might have to reschedule the appointment then, we’re quite busy at the moment, would you be able to make the same time tomorrow?

Patient: Yeah that should work out, sorry about that.

Culture Notes:
If you are running a little late, it’s a good idea to tell the GP. This might open their schedule for somebody else who needs help. Showing up 5 minutes late isn’t so bad, but if you are late by more than 10 minutes, call ahead to let them know. If you miss your appointment because you are late, then it’s your own responsibility.  

UK – On the Phone
Cancellation


This British English dialogue is between the receptionist and a patient.
—Transcript—
Patient: Hi there, my name is Jim Lyons, I had an appointment booked for half past 3 on Friday, er, something’s just come up at work and I won’t be able to make the appointment… uhm, I’ll call back tomorrow and tell you a time when i’ll be able to make it in. Thank you.

Culture Notes:
If you can’t make your appointment at all, definitely tell the GP. This could open another schedule for somebody else.

UK – Arriving at the Office


This British English dialogue is between the front office staff and a patient.
—Transcript—

Receptionist: Good afternoon, how can I help?

Patient: Uhm, my name is Ms. Ezra Fitz. I have an appointment for, I think it’s half past 3?  

Receptionist: Okay, let me check our sheet…Okay half past 3 that’s right. Would you mind writing your name on the registry? Thank you. And you’ll be seeing Doctor Adams today. So just have a seat in the waiting area and I’ll call you through when he’s ready.

Patient: Okay, thank you.

Culture Notes:
If you haven’t registered, you may be asked to print out this form or use one at the GP and fill it out. Here’s an example of an NHS Registration Form you can download.

UK – Getting Called into the Back


—Transcript—

Receptionist: Miss Fitz?….Ezra Fitz?

Patient: Oh yes sorry that’s me!

Receptionist: The doctor will see you now, would you like to come through to Room A with me?

Patient: Okay sure, is it just in the back here?

Receptionist: Yeah that’s right, just follow me.

Culture Notes:
In small GPs, the doctor will usually perform the check-up instead of the nurse. The nurse will lead you to the doctor’s room and lead you inside. Once you’re in the room, the doctor will take care of you and the nurse will leave. Once the door is closed, you’ll have privacy and everything you say to the doctor will be confidential.


Heading to the doctor in a new country can be a little confusing, there’s so much paperwork! If you have any questions about this English dialogue, please let us know in the comments below 🙂

Thanks,

Kat and Mark

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