Doctor’s Office Role Play Part 2

Doctor's Office Role Play Problems on the Phone in English for English Learners 2

Welcome to our Daily English Listening Practice with this week’s series:

Role Play: At the Doctor’s

Problems on the Phone in English

If this is your first time here, you might wanna check out Role Play: At the Doctor’s Day 1 to start from the beginning!

You can download the transcripts here:

American and British Transcripts for Doctor’s Office Role Play

USA – Problems On the Phone in English
Put on Hold


This audio clip gives you some phrases you might hear when on the phone with a receptionist.
—Phrases—

(On the phone)

Hi thank you for calling the Dr’s office, can I put you on hold, please.

Hi, excuse me, but can I put you on hold?

Thanks for waiting.

Sorry to keep you waiting, what can I help you with?

Culture Notes:
This is more than likely the first thing you’ll hear when you call your doctor. Even I’m surprised sometimes when the person on the other line says “Thankyouf’rcallingthedoctor,canIputchuonhold?” Kat: “Huh? What? Oh, yes, yes, sure.” To avoid sounding impolite like me 🙁 , prepare an “Excuse me?” in advance 🙂

USA – Problems On the Phone in English
Confusion


This American audio clip gives you some options for different phrases you can use on the phone with a receptionist. 
—Phrases—

Problems with Listening/Sound

The volume is too loud, could you speak a little softer?

I’m sorry, could you speak a little louder, I can’t really hear you.

I’m sorry, what was that again?

Could you repeat that please?

Problems with Understanding

Could you explain that again to me please

Could you explain what that is. / Could you explain what that means.

Culture Notes:
Sometimes, when we don’t understand something, we pretend it’s a problem with sound. “Oh, it’s loud in here, could you say that again, I’m sorry, could you speak up (speak louder?)” We don’t like to frustrate people, so if you have asked twice about the same problem, and the other person repeats the same thing, maybe using “Could you say that in another/a different way?” will help!

USA – On the Phone
Choosing a Time


This American English clip is between a patient and an office receptionist.

—Transcript—

Receptionist: Alright, so when’s a good time for you to come in?

Patient: Do you have anything available today?

Receptionist: Yes sir, actually can you come in at 2?

Patient: Uh, I could make it by 2:30.

Receptionist: Actually, that’s totally fine. I’ll pencil you in.


This American English clip is between a patient and an office receptionist.

—Transcript—

Receptionist: And what time would you like to make the appointment?

Patient: What about 2 o’clock tomorrow?

Receptionist: I’m afraid the doctor isn’t available after lunch tomorrow. Uhm, let’s see, we could… we could do the same time Thursday?

Patient: Okay, yeah that works for me.

Receptionist: Okay, great, I’ll write that down for you.


This American English clip is between a patient and an office receptionist.

—Transcript—

Receptionist: And when would you like to come in?

Patient: Do you have anything available next week?

Receptionist: Would you prefer the morning or the afternoon?

Patient: Uh, mornings, please.

Receptionist: Okay, we do have uh… Tuesday at 10 is available.

Patient: Okay, Tuesday sounds good. Actually, oh wait, hang on, uhm, I think I can’t do Tuesday, uh would we be able to do Thursday afternoon?

Receptionist: Sure, Thursday, we have an opening at 3 o’clock.

Patient: Yeah, that’d be fine, thank you.


This American English clip is between a patient and an office receptionist.

—Transcript—

Receptionist: Alright, would you like to schedule this week or next?

Patient: What’s the earliest you have next week?

Receptionist: We have a Monday morning at 7 a.m. and a Tuesday at 6:30

Patient: Can I take the Monday at 7?

Receptionist: Yes, of course, I’ll get that written down for you.

Culture Notes:
There’s about a million and one ways to schedule an appointment. The easiest way is to have your schedule open and ready and to offer a time. “Does Friday at 3:30 work?” “Is Tuesday at 10 okay?” “How about next Tuesday at 2?” The receptionist will always repeat the time for you at the end of the conversation to double check.

British Doctor’s Office

UK – Problems on the Phone in English
Put on Hold


—Phrases—

Doctor’s office, would you mind waiting for a moment?

Dr’s office, could I put you on hold for a moment?

Culture Notes:
GP’s are often quite small and may only have 1 receptionist, so don’t be surprised to be put on hold. The receptionist might ask you to hold before you can even speak, and you can just say “Okay” or “No problem.” and then wait until they come back on the line.

UK – Problems on the Phone in English
Confusion

This British English clip will give give you some phrases you could use when on the phone with a receptionist.

—Phrases—

Sorry?

Could you repeat that?

Could you say that again please?

Could you say that a little louder, please? A bit louder?

Culture Notes:
In British English, “Could you…?” is a lot more common than “Can you…?” especially when dealing with patients, customers or clients. ‘Can’ isn’t exactly considered rude, but most British people will say ‘Could’ or ‘Would’ most often.

UK – On the Phone
Choosing a Time

—Transcript—

Receptionist: Okay, so when would you be available to come in?

Patient: Do you have anything today?

Receptionist: Uh, we have a 2:00 appointment available?

Patient: That’ll work.

—Transcript—

Receptionist: Okay and what time were you looking for?

Patient: Well, uhm, let me see, what about 2:00 tomorrow?

Receptionist: Unfortunately everything’s all booked up tomorrow, earliest appointment would be Wednesday at 7 o’clock?

Patient: Okay, well do you have anything available next week?

Receptionist: Yes, we’re fairly open on Mondays. We’ve got appointments at 7 oclock on Monday through Thursday.

Patient: Okay, I’ll go ahead and take the 7:00 on Monday.

—Transcript—

Receptionist: Okay, and what time did you wanna book an appointment?

Patient: What’s the latest you’re available on Tuesdays?

Receptionist: Latest on Tuesday is 4:30.

Patient: Okay, 4:30, uhm, could you do half an hour later at 5?

Receptionist: Latest we could push it to is 4:45, would that be alright?

Patient: Okay, I think I can make that, yes.

Culture Notes:
The busiest times for a GP are usually before and after work, so around 7am and 5pm. So if you can, try to book in advance. If it’s an emergency, you can ask for the ‘soonest possible appointment’. You can also ask for ‘the earliest’ or ‘the latest’ on a specific day if you’re squeezed for time.


Thanks,

Kat and Mark

 

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